PACA - Digital Media Licensing Association

MISCELLANEOUS LEGAL DOCUMENTS

Version 101210A | Word File | 3 Pages | 41 KB | DownloadMutual Nondisclosure Agreement

A Mutual Nondisclosure Agreement that defines confidential information, the duration of the Agreement, its purpose, and measures for maintenance of confidentiality.

EDITORIAL RELATIONS TOOLKIT

Version 111203A | Word File | 5 Pages | 53 KB | DownloadPublic Version

A guide to reviewing license requests, researching usage and addressing questions pertaining to the request.

Version 111203A | Word File | 8 Pages | 57 KB | DownloadMembers Only Version

A guide to reviewing license requests, researching usage and addressing questions pertaining to the request. Including additional guidance for preparing for settlement discussions.

COLLECTION OF CLAIMS

Version 070327A | Word File | 2 Pages | 32 KB | DownloadCollection of Claims Overview

An overview of the collection of claims. Image libraries may need to initiate claims against clients for unpaid bills for the licensing of reproduction rights. Occasionally a client will use the material without paying the fee. In seeking payment, you can remind the client that not only are they delinquent, but any use of the image, by it or its client, is in violation of copyright. After a particular period of time (30, 60 or 90 days) it is a good practice to send a form letter to be retained in your files. The overview also describes various courses of action if there are no results after two months.

BUYER AGREEMENTS

Version 090921A | Word File | 1 Page | 28 KB | DownloadBill of Sale

Form for the transfer between seller and buyer of all slides, negatives, digital files, prints, and model and property releases associated with a collection.

CONTRIBUTOR AGREEMENTS

It is important to have a written agreement with each Contributor you accept images from for licensing purposes. The most common form of business practice at this time is for picture archives to select images from Contributors to license on an exclusive basis, allowing the Contributor to submit other dissimilar images to other image libraries or market on their own. This is different than representing a photographer and all his or her images on an exclusive basis. The agreement is not one of agent and principal, but one where the Contributor licenses rights under copyright that the archive can subsequently license to its clients. Images can be distributed and licensed under different business models, typically referred to as rights managed, royalty free (or broad rights) or subscription basis. Contributors may elect the manner in which the images are licensed or leave it to the company's discretion.

Version 101210A | Word File | 7 Pages | 74 KB | DownloadRights Managed Contributor Agreement

Contributor and Company have determined that it is in their mutual best interest to enter into this agreement whereby Contributor shall submit, and Company shall distribute accepted images for licensing to clients worldwide on a Rights-Managed basis either directly or through third party licensees upon the terms and conditions, set forth herein.

Version 101210A | Word File | 6 Pages | 74 KB | DownloadRoyalty Free Contributor Agreement

Contributor and Company have determined that it is in their mutual best interest to enter into this agreement whereby Contributor shall submit, and Company shall distribute accepted images for licensing to clients worldwide on a Royalty Free basis either directly or through third party licensees upon the terms and conditions, set forth herein.

Version 101210A | Word File | 6 Pages | 74 KB | DownloadRM/RF Contributor Agreement

Contributor and Company have determined that it is in their mutual best interest to enter into this agreement whereby Contributor shall submit, and Company shall distribute accepted images for licensing to clients worldwide in a Rights Managed/Royalty Free basis either directly or through third party licensees upon the terms and conditions, set forth herein.

Version 101210A | Word File | 5 Pages | 49 KB | DownloadWork for Hire Production Agreement

In addition, there are many companies financing production shoots and owning the content. You need a written contract with any non-employee photographer in order to obtain an assignment of copyright. Photographs created by employees are considered work for hire. The Production Agreement form allows for subsequent shoots to be added as a schedule to the main agreement. This form may be adapted for additional shoots or payment types (i.e. flat fee, or flat fee and commission).

DISTRIBUTION AGREEMENTS

These agreements are to be used with third party distributors. Please note that territories must be accurately described under the section “License”.

Version 101210A | Word File | 7 Pages | 98 KB | DownloadRF Distribution Agreement (For Supplier)

The Royalty Free supplier form is intended for use as an agreement to have a third party distribute your RF content exclusively within a territory.

Version 101210A | Word File | 6 Pages | 82 KB | DownloadRF Distribution Agreement (For Distributor)

The RF Distributor form is intended if you wish to distribute the content of a third party.

Version 101210A | Word File | 7 Pages | 98 KB | DownloadRM Distribution Agreement (For Supplier)

In addition, a Supplier form is included for Rights Managed, although you will need to adapt the form to describe your rights clearance system.

Version 101210A | Word File | 7 Pages | 66 KB | DownloadRM Distribution Agreement (For Distributor)

An additional Distributor form is included for Rights Managed, although you will need to adapt the form to describe your rights clearance system.

Version 101210A | Word File | 7 Pages | 82 KB | DownloadRM/RF Distribution Agreement (For Distributor)

An additional Distributor form is included for Rights Managed/Royalty Free, although you will need to adapt the form to describe your rights clearance system.

WEBSITE AGREEMENTS

Version 101210A | Word File | 4 Pages | 49 KB | DownloadWebsite Terms (Comp Use)

Depending on the type of images you’ll be licensing, you may elect to use the following form to govern the terms of your online licensing.

Version 101210A | Word File | 3 Pages | 41 KB | DownloadShort Form Website Terms (No Comp Use)

Depending on the type of images you’ll be licensing, you may elect to use the following form to govern the terms of your online licensing.

Version 101210A | Word File | 4 Pages | 57 KB | DownloadRights Managed End User License Agreement

Depending on the type of images you’ll be licensing, you may elect to use the following form to govern the terms of your online licensing.

Version 101210A | Word File | 3 Pages | 57 KB | DownloadRoyalty Free End User License Agreement

Licensing Images on a royalty free basis or broad rights basis still requires license terms, as the use is not unrestricted. Royalty free is generally understood as the licensing of an image without need to account for the number of uses and the period of use is unlimited, provided that all uses are considered permitted. Royalty free images are either sold as a collection in the form of a CD-ROM, or downloaded as a single image sale over the image library’s web site or call be licensed as a collection to a subscriber via a subscription service allowing unlimited downloads during the subscription period for permitted uses.

If the images are delivered via a physical media such as a CD-ROM or DVD, the license agreement should be included outside the packaging on the product, and included on the disc as well. These license terms are deemed accepted upon purchase. It is known in the software industry as a “shrink-wrap” license. The courts have upheld the validity of these contracts.

Images delivered via the Internet without a physical delivery should be licensed as the RM images, with the user affirmatively accepting the licensing terms upon purchase.

Version 101210A | Word File | 2 Pages | 41 KB | DownloadPrivacy Policy

In the United States, the only regulations regarding the information you collect from users to your website, are regulations promulgated by the FTC regarding information collected that identifies children under the age 13 (see www.ftc.gov). However, many countries in the European Union have much more protective rules regarding the types of information that can be collected, who can have access to the information and how you must inform users regarding the information that is gathered about them. Many United States companies have adopted some of these principals in order to harmonize their business practices with EU affiliates and to do business with EU customers.

In the United States, more as a business policy, users expect to see a company’s privacy policy on a site. If you choose to adopt a privacy policy, be certain that the information is accurate. Information about your customers can be very helpful in marketing and designing your site. You need to collect certain information if you intend to do credit card transactions. If you sell your business, certain customer information may be part of the assets of the sale.

In most cases, policies indicate that customers can decide whether to "opt-out" of direct marketing, and should be given a way to review their personal information and change it. Mostly customers want to know that the information collected is for a justifiable business purpose and that you are not renting the information and selling their names to lists, adding to the "junk" email.

COPYRIGHT

Version 090921A | Word File | 1 Page | 32 KB | DownloadAssignment of Copyright

Form for the transfer of rights, titles and interest, throughout the world, to the photographs identified by photographer and company. Photographer retains the right to use the photographs in personal, noncommercial uses; such as such as portfolio, exhibition, single photographer publication, fine art prints, personal website, and self-promotion.

Version 070327A | Word File | 6 Pages | 48 KB | DownloadCopyright Registration Overview

An overview of copyright registration. It covers three different types of registration and the forms used to register your work with the copyright office.

Version 070327A | PDF File | 4 Pages | 172 KB | DownloadUS Copyright Office Form VA

Form VA can be used to registered photographs that were published together, or an individual published photograph. Form VA can also be used to register an unlimited number of unpublished photographs and is the easiest way to register a collection of unpublished photographs. The current application fee is $45 per registration. It is more economical to register works in groups of published or unpublished images rather than individual images. If you have a few very important images, you may wish to register those images individually.

Version 070327A | PDF File | 4 Pages | 100 KB | DownloadUS Copyright Office Form GR/PPh/CON

Any number of published photographs by a single photographer and published within the same calendar year may be registered with a single deposit, application, and filing fee. It is recommended that published photographs be registered at least every 3 months. (Otherwise, separate registrations might be required.)

The deposit requirements are more flexible than with non-group registration. (Otherwise, actual published copies of the photos might be required.)

There are two basic methods of registering a group of published photos under the regulation—one is with the group photo continuation sheets (Form GR/PPh/CON) and the other is without those forms. Registration with the GR/PPh/CON is encouraged because the form will give complete information about each individual photo, thus ensuring a more complete public record. This could be helpful in defending a copyright claim.

Version 070327A | PDF File | 4 Pages | 168 KB | DownloadForm VA (Unpublished Collection)

A copyright notice is not required to protect unpublished works. The registration of two or more unpublished photographs as a collection, for a single-fee, is very straightforward and only requires submitting a completed Form VA, a registration fee and a deposit of the works to be registered in the collection. (Remember that Form GR/PPh/CON is only used for group registration of published works.)

INFRINGEMENT LETTERS

Images or substantially similar adaptations of images you or your company represent may appear in print or on the web in violation of the copyright holder’s copyright. These form letters are meant to put the infringing user on notice of the infringing use while explaining the copyright law and why it requires them to pay you a fee for the use. You will need to use a different letter depending on your situation. The forms we’ve included cover most cases, and include a follow-up letter should the infringing user fail to respond within a reasonable time. It is helpful to follow-up with a phone call as well.

Version 070327A | Word File | 2 Pages | 28 KB | DownloadInfringement Letter (Use With Registration)

You may find that the infringer actually uses your exact image. In these cases, use the following form letter for images registered with the U.S. Copyright Office. Again, we highly recommend registering your images.

Version 070327A | Word File | 2 Pages | 28 KB | DownloadInfringement Letter (Use Without Registration)

You may find that the infringer actually uses your exact image. In these cases, use the following form letter for images for unregistered images. Again, we highly recommend registering your images.

Version 080430A | Word File | 1 Page | 24 KB | DownloadInfringement Follow-Up Letter

You may find that the infringer actually uses your exact image. In these cases, use the accompanying follow-up letter. Again, we highly recommend registering your images.

Version 070327A | Word File | 2 Pages | 28 KB | Download Infringement Letter (Derivative Use)

You may also find that the infringer uses a copycat adaptation or “derivative work” based on your image. In these cases, use these letters and the above follow-up letter.

Version 070327A | Word File | 1 Page | 28 KB | DownloadDMCA Letter

If it is important that the offending material is removed promptly, and you are less interested in obtaining a license fee from the website owner, you can ask the host server of the website, to remove the infringing material. (For example, you may have granted an exclusive license to a magazine for images of a celebrity and blog sites have copied the images, putting your exclusivity at risk). Under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, Internet Service Providers (ISPs) can avoid monetary liability for the infringing material on a website it is hosting, if it removes the infringing material promptly after receiving a “Notice and Take Down Letter” that meets statutory requirements. Included is a form notice and takedown letter that includes the DMCA requirements. If you can learn the name of the ISP through “WhoIs” or even learn the ISP address number, the number can be looked up on Arin.net to find out the name of the host provider. Many ISP have a registered agent for receipt of notice. These are listed at www.copyright.gov. Other ISP’s have links on their site to the abuse or copyright complaint department.

If you intend to seek monetary damages from the website (not the ISP) make sure you have evidence of the use before the images are taken down. Do not sent the website operator (i.e. the actual infringer and not the host server) the DMCA letter or it will think you do not want monetary damages.

Version 070327A | Word File | 2 Pages | 28 KB | DownloadPicscout/Idee Copyright Infringement Letter

Some members may use the service PicScout, Idee or other companies to detect and report DMCA violations. These following letters are to be used by those members in the event PicScout brings an infringement to their attention.

Version 070327A | Word File | 2 Pages | 28 KB | DownloadPicscout/Idee Alternate Infringement Letter

Some members may use the service PicScout, Idee or other companies to detect and report DMCA violations. In the event the offending use is removed from the website but retroactive fees remain unpaid, the following letter is to be used.

Version 070327A | Word File | 2 Pages | 28 KB | DownloadPicscout/Idee Follow-Up Letter

Some members may use the service PicScout, Idee or other companies to detect and report DMCA violations. This follow-up letter is to be used by those members in the event PicScout brings an infringement to their attention.

LITIGATION FORMS

Version 070327A | Word File | 5 Pages | 28 KB | DownloadSample Federal Copyright Complaint

In the event that no amicable measures bring an infringing user around to paying a proposed fee, it may be necessary to send them a draft complaint to convince them of the seriousness of the matter. Different jurisdictions have special rules as to who can be sued in that particular jurisdiction and a case can be dismissed if the court lacks jurisdiction over the matter or the defendant. As such, we recommend you seek legal counsel when using this form.

Version 070327A | Word File | 7 Pages | 36 KB | DownloadSettlement Agreement & Mutual Releases

The form release is a release for adults with an optional signature line for a guardian in the case of minor models and one for property. With respect to releases for children, it should be noted that each state has a different age of majority. The law of majority in the state of the child's residence determines if the child qualifies to sign the adult release. In the event the child does not qualify to sign the adult release the legal guardian, whether it be parent or otherwise, must sign the release.

RELEASES

A release is a writing, signed by the subject of a photograph which states that he or she consents to being photographed and, more important, that the photograph may be used for the purpose set forth in the release.

There are many misconceptions concerning releases. One misconception is that a release once signed cannot be revoked by the signing party. In certain jurisdictions if no consideration was given for the release, or no consideration is stated in the release, then the signing party may revoke that release. It is quite important that the form of the release contain the necessary language to create an irrevocable release by reciting that consideration has been given for the release. In New York State, written consent is sufficient, without consideration.

A release is an Image library's protection against invasion of privacy claims. However, the release must be extensive enough to cover all the intended uses for a particular photograph. Extensive releases may even include the right to retouch or alter the image without the model's authorization. A limited release, permitting the reproduction of a photograph in a specified publication, would not authorize the use of the photograph depicting the model in any other publication or additional usages. The absence or existence of a release should be identified, either on the mount if analog, or included with the information attached to the digital file. Contributors should supply copies of the release when available.

You should be aware that some objects are covered by copyright, trademark and trade dress. It is for this reason that the terms contained in these forms specifically state that the user is responsible for obtaining all necessary permissions. Getty Images has offered PACA its forms of releases as well, including foreign releases.

Version 101210A | Word File | 1 Page | 41 KB | DownloadModel Release

The form release is a release for adults with an optional signature line for a guardian in the case of minor models and one for property. With respect to releases for children, it should be noted that each state has a different age of majority. The law of majority in the state of the child's residence determines if the child qualifies to sign the adult release. In the event the child does not qualify to sign the adult release the legal guardian, whether it be parent or otherwise, must sign the release.

Many photographers will attach a copy of the model’s driver license to the release. It identifies the model, signature and date of birth in the event there is ever a claim that the model did not sign the release.

For stock photography purposes, no writings or additions should be made to the form. No oral restrictions should be agreed to between the photographer and model. A photographer should be clear when shooting a model for stock, that the uses are broad and the model will not have aright to approve any use.

Version 101210A | Word File | 1 Page | 37 KB | DownloadProperty Release

The question often arises as to whether or not an animal has a right of privacy or publicity, and if so is a release required. The law regarding right of privacy and publicity actions apply only to persons as they are written. A question arises with a celebrity animal such as Rin Tin Tin. In this instance, the owner may have a property right to the animal which would prohibit unauthorized exploitation of the animal's image. These protections are not founded upon rights of privacy but are covered by the law of copyright, trademark, unfair competition, etc. It is advisable, therefore, when licensing the use of a photograph of a famous animal for commercials to obtain a release from the owner of the animal to avoid being sued under other areas of the law.

Along the same lines, buildings and other personal property such as cars, not being human, do not have a "right to privacy" or a "right of publicity". However, certain buildings and property may be so well recognized that the owner may have a property interest in the building. That is, if the building identifies the owner, the owner's right of privacy or right of publicity might be violated. This may prevent others from exploiting the image for commercial gain without the owner's permission. Generally under the law of trademark, unfair competition, and privacy, the use of a building or a backdrop will not violate anyone's property interest absent any particular identity. Advertisers typically request property releases for building so property released images have greater commercial value.

If a photograph of a famous building that is associated with the owner is to be used for commercial purposes, it may be advisable to require the client to obtain a release. It is unclear under the law whether one must obtain a new release from a new owner of a building if the building is sold after the original release is obtained. Since the property right belongs to the person and not to the building, a new release would be recommended.

FORMS FOR ANALOG ORIGINALS

These remaining forms are legacy form from the time before digital files, the internet and when all images we delivered to the stock library in the form of original transparencies or film, and the film was leased directly to the client, or used to make duplicate slides. If you still accept original film (irreplaceable material) you should use these forms as a guide to avoid liability for any loss, damage or inability to return original material.

Version 070327A | Word File | 4 Pages | 64 KB | DownloadContributor Mailing Request & Instructions

This form should be sent at the time any contributor submits material to you for editing whether a contract contributor or not. A file for each Contributor should be created. A duplicate of any document sent (both front and back) should be retained by you for your files. The terms on the reverse side limits your liability with respect to such submissions. This form is primarily for the receipt of physical material. If you accept digital submissions of material, make sure you have “image submission guidelines” that the Contributor agrees to follow. While you do not have liability for loss or damage to original artwork, it remains important to keep track of images submitted and accepted by each contributor.

Version 070327A | Word File | 3 Pages | 40 KB | DownloadContributor Receipt

This is to be filled out in duplicate and sent to the Contributor when you accept the submitted materials. The various columns set forth are to indicate the number of different items accepted. The box below indicating new contributor or not, is for your own internal records.

Version 070327A | Word File | 3 Pages | 40 KB | DownloadContributor Acceptances & Returns

This is for material that you are returning to the Contributor and not accepting in your file. A duplicate should be retained by you.

Version 070327A | Word File | 6 Pages | 76 KB | DownloadDelivery Contract

This important document must be sent with each submission of original Images to clients. As you can see by the terms of the reverse side, no use can be made of your material until an invoice is submitted and paid. This will foreclose use by any potential user even if they purchase an image for research purposes. This document is to be signed by the recipient if there is a pickup either by the client or messenger service.

If Images are sent electronically, or on any digital media, a delivery contract should be accepted by the recipient, either by accepting the terms through an online “click-through” agreement, or by including the terms with the digital media. Before sending digital media to a client for the first time, you should obtain written acceptance to your terms of delivery.

Version 070327A | Word File | 2 Pages | 44 KB | DownloadDelivery Control Form

This document is an internal record of what material is delivered to a client. It is used for the delivery of physical material.

Version 070327A | Word File | 6 Pages | 52 KB | DownloadHolding Or Return Form

The holding or return form is to be included with the delivery contract. This form is made in triplicate; one file copy, and the original and one client copy to be sent to the client. This indicates what Images the client will be holding and what Images were being returned.

You should have a policy regarding the retention of digital files. This policy should be stated in your online licensing agreement. Some members make a distinction between low resolution and higher resolution digital files. Another approach is to require that information identifying the digital file and the source of the image be retained as part of the image file, and that no reuse can be made without permission and the creation of a license.

Version 070327A | Word File | 6 Pages | 52 KB | DownloadPast Due Image Statement

This is used when clients are holding images beyond the 14-day holding period, and is a reminder sent to them. Your copy becomes a permanent record in your file. This form is used when you have delivered material to a client that you require returned. It is not necessary if digital files are downloaded. If you send your client high resolution files on digital media, you may also want those files returned.

Version 070327A | Word File | 7 Pages | 56 KB | DownloadInvoice

An original is to be sent and a copy kept for your file. The terms of the license, in detail, as well as the description of the photographs, the number of the photographs and the amount charged are set forth. The terms and conditions of delivery are on the reverse side.

Version 070327A | Word File | 2 Pages | 8 KB | DownloadDelivery Inquiry

This form should be filed with each delivery contract. This is to be filled out by your staff as a permanent record, when following up on analog photographs that are out to clients. Successive returns should be indicated as well. This document is important as a business record kept in the ordinary course of business. You may wish to keep track of digital images that are sent to clients for purposes of following up on usage.

Version 070327A | Word File | 7 Pages | 56 KB | DownloadFinancial Disclosure Form

It is recommended that you have all new clients complete and return a signed form. Not only will you determine if you are dealing with a sound financial entity but you will have an acknowledgement of your delivery contract terms should a problem arise in the future.

AMICUS BRIEFS AND NOTICE OF INQUIRY (NOI) RESPONSES

An amicus brief comes from amicus curiae or "friend of the court". This is a court document filed by someone who is not directly related to the case under consideration. The most classic example of an amicus brief is a document filed by an advocacy group. The additional information found in such a document can be useful for the judge evaluating the case, and it becomes part of the official case record.

Version 120202A | PDF File | 23 Pages | 217 KB | DownloadCariou v Prince Amicus Brief

PACA lent its support to photographer Patrick Cariou in an amicus brief presented to the federal courts of the 2nd Circuit in an appeal brought by appropriation artist Richard Prince. Prince argues that he should be permitted to appropriate photographs without licensing under the fair use defense by merely calling his work art and transformative.

Version 120125A | PDF File | 40 Pages | 131 KB | DownloadJones v Corbis Amicus Motion To Leave

PACA took the lead in writing an amicus brief (friend of the court) to the 9th Circuit this January in supporting Corbis Corporation in a claim brought against it by Shirley Jones who asserts that the display of ten photographs depicting her on its website (for which no sale was ever made) violates California’s statutory right of publicity and common law because there is no model release granting Corbis permission to display the images.

Version 101015A | PDF File | 53 Pages | 545 KB | DownloadViacom-YouTube Amicus Brief

PACA supported the legal arguments of the briefs filed by Viacom et. al. and pursuant to the court’s direction, coordinated arguments to avoid repetition. This case concerns business liability for copyright infringment after complying with DMCA-required takedown notices.

Version 101015A | PDF File | 24 Pages | 201 KB | DownloadBean-Houghton Mifflin Amicus Brief

PACA filed an amicus brief in support of plaintiff Tom Bean's appeal seeking reversal of the district court's dismissal of his complaint. This case concerns the copyright validity of individual works registered as part of a larger catalog.

Version 101015A | PDF File | 37 Pages | 352 KB | DownloadExpandedBean-HMH Amicus Brief

PACA filed an amicus brief in support of plaintiff Tom Bean's appeal seeking reversal of the district court's dismissal of his complaint. This case concerns the copyright validity of individual works registered as part of a larger catalog. Includes Certificate of Compliance and Certificate of Service.

Version 100624A | PDF File | 24 Pages | 584 KB | DownloadMuench-PACA Amicus Brief

PACA supported the legal arguments of the briefs filed by Corbis Corporation and American Society of Media Photographers (ASMP) and pursuant to the court’s direction, coordinated arguments to avoid repetition.

Version 100624A | PDF File | 16 Pages | 1.9 MB | DownloadMuench-ASMP Amicus Brief

PACA supported the legal arguments of the briefs filed by Corbis Corporation and American Society of Media Photographers (ASMP) and pursuant to the court’s direction, coordinated arguments to avoid repetition.

Version 100624A | PDF File | 25 Pages | 192 KB | DownloadMuench-Corbis Amicus Brief

PACA supported the legal arguments of the briefs filed by Corbis Corporation and American Society of Media Photographers (ASMP) and pursuant to the court’s direction, coordinated arguments to avoid repetition.

Version 110615A | PDF File | 22 Pages | 84 KB | DownloadPACA-ASMP-Corbis Amicus Brief

PACA supported the legal arguments of the briefs filed by Corbis Corporation and American Society of Media Photographers (ASMP) and pursuant to the court’s direction, coordinated arguments to avoid repetition.

Version 120118A | PDF File | 12 Pages | 143 KB | DownloadCopyright Office Notice Of Inquiry Response

PACA responses to U.S. Copyright Office Notice Of Inquiry regarding Study On Remedies For Copyright Small Claims.

Version 130204A | PDF File | 9 Pages | 979 KB | DownloadCopyright Office Notice Of Inquiry Response

PACA responses to U.S. Copyright Office Notice Of Inquiry regarding Orphan Works and Mass Digitization.

Version 130412A | PDF File | 8 Pages | 3.2 MB | DownloadCopyright Office Notice Of Inquiry Response

PACA responses to U.S. Copyright Office Notice Of Inquiry regarding Study On Remedies For Copyright Small Claims.